Episode 58: On Leadership and Listening: A conversation with Traci Ruble

POBS season 2 - ep 58.png

If you have ever aspired to step into a leadership role, or consider yourself a leader but want to do it better, you’re going to love this week’s conversation.  I’m speaking with Traci Ruble, a therapist, public speaker, and CEO of multiple projects.  We’re talking about redefining what leadership really means, how to truly listen, and why both are so important in human life.  Traci has such a unique process in getting onstage, from concept to delivery and post-review.  It’s all about giving yourself permission, working through the imposter syndrome, and noticing when you feel most embodied.  

We also talk about the importance of relationships as leaders, with our tribes, our partners, and with those we lead and work with.  Traci has learned valuable ways of ensuring that she and others feel supported, to combat the loneliness as well as honor our existence.  Deep listening is a big piece of that, but I love the way that Traci redefines what listening really means.  This truly is the Practice of Being Seen.

Resources Referenced in this Episode:

Richard Schwartz, Ph.D.

Jonathan Fields

Anxious Attachment Status

 James Hillman’s book and concept, The Soul Code

Where to find Traci:

TraciRuble.com

PsychedinSanFrancisco.com

SidewalkTalkSF.com

If you're interested in working with Rebecca Wong, you can find out more about her services here: practiceofbeingseen.com/work-with-rebecca

To join the #POBScast Community practiceofbeingseen.com/community

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If you have questions or inquiries, email us at practiceofbeingseen@gmail.com

 

 

 

Quoted in the Episode:

 If It’s not like pushing water uphill, it’s probably a good sign. I’m not saying that it doesn’t take effort and that everything is easy. It takes effort, but I think the biggest effort for me has been giving myself permission to just stand in it all the way. - Traci Ruble

If It’s not like pushing water uphill, it’s probably a good sign. I’m not saying that it doesn’t take effort and that everything is easy. It takes effort, but I think the biggest effort for me has been giving myself permission to just stand in it all the way. - Traci Ruble

 It feels to me like when we get heard, that's what happens. We come down into our body in that relational exchange. In that hearing, we're just a little more embodied, but at the same time, deeply connected, deeply connected with our soul at the same time. - Traci Ruble  photo: Candace Smith Photography

It feels to me like when we get heard, that's what happens. We come down into our body in that relational exchange. In that hearing, we're just a little more embodied, but at the same time, deeply connected, deeply connected with our soul at the same time. - Traci Ruble photo: Candace Smith Photography

 When we listen to somebody, we hear them into existence. We don’t know that we exist all the way unless we’re held in the mind of another. -Traci Ruble  photo: Peek Photography

When we listen to somebody, we hear them into existence. We don’t know that we exist all the way unless we’re held in the mind of another. -Traci Ruble photo: Peek Photography

 Being a leader is not about being a bad guy or a boss or a jerk. Being a leader is about being a strong holder of relationship. - Traci Ruble

Being a leader is not about being a bad guy or a boss or a jerk. Being a leader is about being a strong holder of relationship. - Traci Ruble

 It’s still relatively new for women to be in leadership roles that pull them away from being home. And I think this is, societally speaking and in terms of our families, a sign of evolution. It’s also one of those things that perhaps we don’t have too many models for, in terms of how to do it. So we’re learning as we go. And so are our partners. - Rebecca Wong

It’s still relatively new for women to be in leadership roles that pull them away from being home. And I think this is, societally speaking and in terms of our families, a sign of evolution. It’s also one of those things that perhaps we don’t have too many models for, in terms of how to do it. So we’re learning as we go. And so are our partners. - Rebecca Wong